The Conservative Seminarian

Theology ~ Religion ~ Culture | Tidbits from me | Links to others |

Category: Links

April 13, 2018 Resources: Be Ordinary; Church & State; On Race

This article aligns with a theme I landed on in an adult Sunday School class a few years ago: live an ordinary, faithful, plodding, daily life of faithfulness.

Dr. Kevin Bauder writes a helpful essay explaining the meaning of the historic Baptist distinctive known as the separation of church and state.

Though I disagree with Doug Wilson on certain important theological points, he is one of the best writers on current theological and cultural issues that you will find. His response to some recent bilge from The Gospel Coalition is eloquent, gracious, and accurate.

 

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December 22, 2017 Resources: Ann Judson; Preservation; Christmas Gifts

On this date in 1789, Ann Hasseltine (later, Judson) was born. The story of the Judsons is a moving one. If you have not read it, I’d encourage you to find a copy of “To the Golden Shore” by Courtney Anderson, as well as a copy of “My Heart In His Hands” by Sharon James. Both will move, strengthen, and encourage the hearts of believers.

Here is a good introductory (video) conversation on the reliable transmission of the New Testament.

Should we give gifts at Christmastime or withdraw from the practice altogether?

November 24, 2017 Resources: Conservative Christianity; Glorifying God…In Our Bodies

I usually wait to publish these Resource posts until I have 3 or 4 links to send out. However, these two articles were so good, I wanted to go ahead and get them out today for your Thanksgiving Weekend reading.

First, Dr. Kevin Bauder reviews a major (if oft forgotten) tenet of genuinely conservative Christianity: the rejection of crisis. This thought has major implications for the kind of revivalistic, pressure-packed decisionism evinced by a broad swath of American Evangelicalism.

Second, Dr. Bauder writes an excellent article pointing out that bringing glory to God is not only a spiritual activity (though it is that). It is certainly a physical, i.e. material activity as well, and will remain so for all eternity. Let us not minimize the material nature of glorifying our God. This thought has significant ramifications for our theology of work, helping us to understand the meaningful nature of our labor.

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